Explore the Acholi Region

Orphans

Decades of conflict have had vast arrays of catastrophic effects on humanitarian and economic stability of Northern Uganda (NU). These problems range from countless loss of lives, abduction of children for child-soldiers and sex slaves for Lord Resistant Army (LRA),...

Decades of Conflicts

Northern Uganda (NU) has experienced over four decades of perennial crises starting from the dictatorship of Idi Amin Dada to the notorious foray of the Lord Resistance Army (LRA) led by Kony. Although the peace prospect in NU has improved, the aftermath of four...

Nodding Syndrome

Decades of conflict have had vast arrays of catastrophic effects on humanitarian and economic stability of Northern Uganda (NU). These problems range from countless loss of lives, abduction of children for child-soldiers and sex slaves for Lord Resistant Army (LRA),...

About Uganda

Uganda is a landlocked country in East Africa. The country is bordered to the east by Kenya, to the north by South Sudan, to the west by the Democratic Republic of the Congo, to the southwest by Rwanda, and to the south by Tanzania. The southern part of the country includes a substantial portion of Lake Victoria, shared with Kenya and Tanzania. Uganda is in the African Great Lakes region, lies within the Nile basin, and has a varied but generally modified equatorial climate. As of 2023, it has a population of around 49.6 million, of which 8.5 million live in the capital and largest city of Kampala. The official language is English.

The World Bank’s 2015 Worldwide Governance Indicators ranked Uganda in the worst 12 percentile of all countries.

“Information sourced from Wikipedia. For more details, please refer to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uganda.”

About the Acholi Region

The Acholi people (also spelled Acoli) are a Nilotic ethnic group of Luo peoples (also spelled Lwo), found in Magwi County in South Sudan and Northern Uganda (an area commonly referred to as Acholiland), including the districts of Agago, Amuru, Gulu, Kitgum, Nwoya, Lamwo, Pader and Omoro District. The Acholi were estimated to number 2.3 million people and over 45,000 more were living in South Sudan in 2000.

“Information sourced from Wikipedia. For more details, please refer to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acholi_people

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